Director, Actor, and Sometimes Gardener
 "The story is helmed by Don Browning ( David Wolber ), of the Iowa Brownings, although the adult Don has long since made Boston his home.  Torrey and company honor the script's fluidity above all else, and even double down on this fast and loose approach to time and place with staging that is utterly unconcerned with the laws of physics.   Wolber  proves adeptly adrift as the adult Don, balks at unfairness as his younger self, and capably leads the many abrupt tonal shifts between.  This 'Leaving Iowa' is a rocketing comic whirligig that spends a lot of time on the funny bone, but also makes some nostalgic emotional appeals in the realm of bygones and closure. " -  Carolyn Hayes Harmer, Encoremichigan.com

Leaving Iowa by Tim Clue and Spike Manton

Tipping Point Theatre
Northville, Michigan
Jan.-Mar., 2015

 "The story is helmed by Don Browning ( David Wolber ), of the Iowa Brownings, although the adult Don has long since made Boston his home.  Torrey and company honor the script's fluidity above all else, and even double down on this fast and loose approach to time and place with staging that is utterly unconcerned with the laws of physics.   Wolber  proves adeptly adrift as the adult Don, balks at unfairness as his younger self, and capably leads the many abrupt tonal shifts between.  This 'Leaving Iowa' is a rocketing comic whirligig that spends a lot of time on the funny bone, but also makes some nostalgic emotional appeals in the realm of bygones and closure. " -  Carolyn Hayes Harmer, Encoremichigan.com

"The story is helmed by Don Browning (David Wolber), of the Iowa Brownings, although the adult Don has long since made Boston his home.  Torrey and company honor the script's fluidity above all else, and even double down on this fast and loose approach to time and place with staging that is utterly unconcerned with the laws of physics.  Wolber proves adeptly adrift as the adult Don, balks at unfairness as his younger self, and capably leads the many abrupt tonal shifts between.  This 'Leaving Iowa' is a rocketing comic whirligig that spends a lot of time on the funny bone, but also makes some nostalgic emotional appeals in the realm of bygones and closure. " - Carolyn Hayes Harmer, Encoremichigan.com

 "The trip becomes an anthology of vacation incidents – brought to life in a swirl of sketch-like scenes by  David Wolber , Dave Davies, Brenda Lane, Alysia Kolascz, and Ryan Carlson. There are a lot of good, clean laughs derived from recognizing the simple, universal truths that govern parent-child, sibling-sibling relationships.  One of the most satisfying aspects of this TPT production, directed by Beth Torrey, is the seamless way the past and present blur together – not unlike the rows and rows of corn viewed from the window of the family’s speeding car."-  Patty Nolan, Examiner.com

"The trip becomes an anthology of vacation incidents – brought to life in a swirl of sketch-like scenes by David Wolber, Dave Davies, Brenda Lane, Alysia Kolascz, and Ryan Carlson. There are a lot of good, clean laughs derived from recognizing the simple, universal truths that govern parent-child, sibling-sibling relationships.  One of the most satisfying aspects of this TPT production, directed by Beth Torrey, is the seamless way the past and present blur together – not unlike the rows and rows of corn viewed from the window of the family’s speeding car."- Patty Nolan, Examiner.com

 "One winning moment involves an especially lame Civil War re-enactment in which Dad is the first to volunteer when the audience is called on for help. Don, of course, tries to crawl under his chair... Kolascz and  Wolber  have the tougher job of playing their characters as both sniping adults and whining children, with  Wolber  using a red baseball hat as part of his transformation.  Literally and symbolically, the culmination of "Leaving Iowa" takes us to the heart of America, celebrating family and country with a carload of sincerity and good humor." -  John Monaghan, Detroit Free Press

"One winning moment involves an especially lame Civil War re-enactment in which Dad is the first to volunteer when the audience is called on for help. Don, of course, tries to crawl under his chair... Kolascz and Wolber have the tougher job of playing their characters as both sniping adults and whining children, with Wolber using a red baseball hat as part of his transformation.  Literally and symbolically, the culmination of "Leaving Iowa" takes us to the heart of America, celebrating family and country with a carload of sincerity and good humor." - John Monaghan, Detroit Free Press

 "It is very funny to see Wolber and Kolascz portray not only their characters as adults, but also as children.  Wolber  is very effective as Don, and Kolascz is, as always, a delight. Davies and Lane are perfectly suited for their roles as Dad and Mom." -  Robert Delaney, New Monitor

"It is very funny to see Wolber and Kolascz portray not only their characters as adults, but also as children. Wolber is very effective as Don, and Kolascz is, as always, a delight. Davies and Lane are perfectly suited for their roles as Dad and Mom." - Robert Delaney, New Monitor

#1 TPT Leaving Iowa Wolber, & Davies.jpg
  Leaving Iowa  by Tim Clue and Spike Manton Director - Beth Torrey  Don - David Wolber* Sis/Multiple - Alysia Kolascz Mom - Brenda Lane Dad - Dave Davies Multiple - Ryan Carlson*  Stage Manager - Tracy L. Spada* Set design -  Monika Essen  Light design - David Koltunchik Costume design -  Suzanne Young  Sound design - Julia Garlotte Props design - Ryan Fisher Production Assistant - Nick Yocum  *member Actors Equity Association photos by Howard and Charlotte Meyer

Leaving Iowa
by Tim Clue and Spike Manton
Director - Beth Torrey

Don - David Wolber*
Sis/Multiple - Alysia Kolascz
Mom - Brenda Lane
Dad - Dave Davies
Multiple - Ryan Carlson*

Stage Manager - Tracy L. Spada*
Set design - Monika Essen
Light design - David Koltunchik
Costume design - Suzanne Young
Sound design - Julia Garlotte
Props design - Ryan Fisher
Production Assistant - Nick Yocum

*member Actors Equity Association
photos by Howard and Charlotte Meyer