Director, Actor, and Sometimes Gardener
 " Carol'd's  best, most innovative moments are hauntingly memorable. Chief among them is the shape-shifting Ghost of Christmas Past, which is played by the show's four ensemble actors (Terry Heck, Chelsea Sadler, B. J. Love, and Kevin Young) while wearing white masks.  Dickens' original description of the Ghost is wildly surreal and pretty darn impossible to represent in a non-animated medium, but  Wolber  and Zettelmaier (and the show's talented production team) bring us closer to the author's original vision than most adaptations dare to even try." - Jenn McKee, AnnArbor.com

Christmas Carol'd by Charles Dickens, adapted by Joseph Zettelmaier

Performance Network Theatre
Ann Arbor, MI
Nov/Dec 2009

World Premiere

 " Carol'd's  best, most innovative moments are hauntingly memorable. Chief among them is the shape-shifting Ghost of Christmas Past, which is played by the show's four ensemble actors (Terry Heck, Chelsea Sadler, B. J. Love, and Kevin Young) while wearing white masks.  Dickens' original description of the Ghost is wildly surreal and pretty darn impossible to represent in a non-animated medium, but  Wolber  and Zettelmaier (and the show's talented production team) bring us closer to the author's original vision than most adaptations dare to even try." - Jenn McKee, AnnArbor.com

"Carol'd's best, most innovative moments are hauntingly memorable. Chief among them is the shape-shifting Ghost of Christmas Past, which is played by the show's four ensemble actors (Terry Heck, Chelsea Sadler, B. J. Love, and Kevin Young) while wearing white masks.  Dickens' original description of the Ghost is wildly surreal and pretty darn impossible to represent in a non-animated medium, but Wolber and Zettelmaier (and the show's talented production team) bring us closer to the author's original vision than most adaptations dare to even try." - Jenn McKee, AnnArbor.com

 "A cool take on a classic tale - 'Carol'd' is a scaled down version that plays better in the intimate setting of the Performance Network's theater than a full-blown production of the show would.  This 'Carol' has been injected with a good shot of comedy, amplifying the subtle humor that can be found in Dickens' version.  'Christmas Carol'd' can best be enjoyed when viewed in the spirit in which it was created: a tight, compact, interpretation of the story with a bit of an edge added to it.  The production is directed by  David Wolber " -  Daniel Skora, New Monitor

"A cool take on a classic tale - 'Carol'd' is a scaled down version that plays better in the intimate setting of the Performance Network's theater than a full-blown production of the show would.  This 'Carol' has been injected with a good shot of comedy, amplifying the subtle humor that can be found in Dickens' version.  'Christmas Carol'd' can best be enjoyed when viewed in the spirit in which it was created: a tight, compact, interpretation of the story with a bit of an edge added to it.  The production is directed by David Wolber" - Daniel Skora, New Monitor

 "In this reviewer's estimation, the Performance Network's premiere of 'Christmas Carol'd,' by local artist Joseph Zettelmaier, takes its place at the top of the heap.  For theaters without the means or space to stage a traditional large-cast version of Scrooge's tale, they would do well to look at 'Christmas Carol'd.'  Dickens's cherished dialogue gets a surge of warmth and comedy from the narration, and the story is as faithful as  the staging is fresh and sharp. " -  Carolyn Hayes, Rogue Critic

"In this reviewer's estimation, the Performance Network's premiere of 'Christmas Carol'd,' by local artist Joseph Zettelmaier, takes its place at the top of the heap.  For theaters without the means or space to stage a traditional large-cast version of Scrooge's tale, they would do well to look at 'Christmas Carol'd.'  Dickens's cherished dialogue gets a surge of warmth and comedy from the narration, and the story is as faithful as the staging is fresh and sharp." - Carolyn Hayes, Rogue Critic

 "Four of the production's five players tackle multiple roles – totaling 33 in all – leaving a few to the imagination and Scrooge a stand-alone part for John Seibert.  This unusual approach to casting Dickens' epic production is certainly the most unique aspect of 'Carol'd,' but it is also its greatest achievement, because Zettelmaier's script, brought to the stage by director  David Wolber , manages to keep all these roles distinct, coherent and engaging.  ...a touching and potent piece of storytelling." -  D. A. Blackburn, Pridesource.com

"Four of the production's five players tackle multiple roles – totaling 33 in all – leaving a few to the imagination and Scrooge a stand-alone part for John Seibert.  This unusual approach to casting Dickens' epic production is certainly the most unique aspect of 'Carol'd,' but it is also its greatest achievement, because Zettelmaier's script, brought to the stage by director David Wolber, manages to keep all these roles distinct, coherent and engaging.  ...a touching and potent piece of storytelling." - D. A. Blackburn, Pridesource.com

 "Tonight, I was treated to Joe Zettelmaier’s crack at the chestnut, 'Christmas Carol’d' thoughtfully, even brilliantly, mounted at the Performance Network Theatre in Ann Arbor, and had a very happy surprise.  Joe Z obviously understands Mr. Dickens’ book and knows how to dramatize it.  The words are preserved for the most part, but the dramatic scenes are neatly intertwined with the narration, done by four excellent and well-cast actors who also play all the roles but Scrooge.   David Wolber’s  direction keeps the story flowing so the two complement each other as they gracefully flow back and forth.  What emerges is not an adapted book, but a play." - Marty Smith, MartySmithActorWriter Blogspot

"Tonight, I was treated to Joe Zettelmaier’s crack at the chestnut, 'Christmas Carol’d' thoughtfully, even brilliantly, mounted at the Performance Network Theatre in Ann Arbor, and had a very happy surprise.  Joe Z obviously understands Mr. Dickens’ book and knows how to dramatize it.  The words are preserved for the most part, but the dramatic scenes are neatly intertwined with the narration, done by four excellent and well-cast actors who also play all the roles but Scrooge.  David Wolber’s direction keeps the story flowing so the two complement each other as they gracefully flow back and forth.  What emerges is not an adapted book, but a play." -Marty Smith, MartySmithActorWriter Blogspot

 "One device that I especially liked was when the four narrators would each recite a word, one after another, sequentially, to complete a sentence.  It is a very effective way to show cohesiveness, that they were of one mind - clever and enjoyable to watch when done well as it was here." -  Arts Lyfe

"One device that I especially liked was when the four narrators would each recite a word, one after another, sequentially, to complete a sentence.  It is a very effective way to show cohesiveness, that they were of one mind - clever and enjoyable to watch when done well as it was here." - Arts Lyfe

  Christmas Carol'd  by  Joseph Zettelmaier  (adapted from Charles Dickens) Director - David Wolber  Scrooge - John Seibert* Caroler 1 - Terry Heck* Caroler 2 - Chelsea Sadler Caroler 3 - BJ Love* Caroler 4 - Kevin Young*  Stage Manager - Charlyn Swarthout* Set/costume/props design -  Monika Essen  Light design - Daniel C. Walker Sound design - Helena Byrne Music director - R. Mackenzie Lewis   *member Actors Equity Association photos by Peter Smith

Christmas Carol'd
by Joseph Zettelmaier
(adapted from Charles Dickens)
Director - David Wolber

Scrooge - John Seibert*
Caroler 1 - Terry Heck*
Caroler 2 - Chelsea Sadler
Caroler 3 - BJ Love*
Caroler 4 - Kevin Young*

Stage Manager - Charlyn Swarthout*
Set/costume/props design - Monika Essen
Light design - Daniel C. Walker
Sound design - Helena Byrne
Music director - R. Mackenzie Lewis

*member Actors Equity Association
photos by Peter Smith